Monthly Archives: November 2015

The Seventh Commandment – For Young Children

THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT
“Thou shalt not commit adultery”

means —

that we should not bring impure thoughts and behavior to our marriage. When a man and woman marry, they make a promise to love and honor each other. If one of them breaks that promise, by going to someone else for the kind of love and affection they should be getting only from their marriage partner, then it might be said that they are “committing adultery.” In the same way, we also do not let impure thoughts muddy the understanding of ourselves as the “image and likeness” of God.

 

THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT
“Thou shalt not commit adultery”

helps us —

to keep our families together and to draw us closer to God. Adultery poisons the marriage relationship. Everyone suffers in some way. But think how happy a family would be if
everyone was trusted to be loyal to the family. In the same way, we must be true and
loyal to ourselves and to God. We must not look for happiness outside of our relationship with God, good. Learning to turn away from wrong behavior while young, helps us gain the self-discipline which will protect us from committing adultery. This will keep our lives pure and in obedience to God.

* * *

7th C for Kids

 

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“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #14

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors
And Love is reflected in love.

Question: What if it is ourselves that we need to forgive?

Answer: At some point, everyone feels guilty about something they have done wrong.
But we need not spend any more time than is necessary regretting our mistakes. There are important steps to take to erase the debt that we may seem to owe others or to God.

While it is true that from God’s point-of-view there is no reality to sin and evil, because they are no part of God’s creation, that does not mean we are free to do evil, and expect to get away with it! Mary Baker Eddy tells us what to do:

“A sinner is not reformed merely by assuring him that he cannot be a sinner because there is no sin. To put down the claim of sin, you must detect it, remove the mask, point out the illusion, and thus get the victory over sin and so prove its unreality.” (S&H 447:22-27)

“Wisdom and Love may require many sacrifices of self to save us from sin. One sacrifice, however great, is insufficient to pay the debt of sin.” (S&H 23:1-4)

We must ask for God’s help, and pray to know that the law of Truth and Love are at work!

Divine Love, as unconscious as incapable of error, pursues the evil that hideth itself, strips off its disguises, and — behold the result: evil, uncovered, is self-destroyed.” (Mis. 209:32)

The Bible assures us:   “He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy.” (Prov. 28:13)

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #14

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #13

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors
And Love is reflected in love.

Question: Is forgiving debts important to living Christian Science?

Answer: Yes, because it shows that we understand the basic laws of God and His nature.
We could not hold a grudge or debt against someone, and at the same time affirm that evil is unreal. That would be hypocrisy, which Jesus condemned, and this would prevent healing.

We are not just Scientists, we are also Christians, and so even if we were not yet at the point where we understand the unreality of evil, we can at least try to express the lovely traits that Jesus urged upon us. Mary Baker Eddy therefore writes:

“A Christian Scientist is a humanitarian; he is benevolent, forgiving, long-suffering, and seeks to overcome evil with good.” (Man. 46:26)

“In Science, divine Love alone governs man; and a Christian Scientist reflects the sweet amenities of Love, in rebuking sin, in true brotherliness, charitableness, and forgiveness.” (Man. 40:5-11)

“If a member of the church is inclined to be uncharitable, or to condemn his brother without cause, let him put his finger to his lips, and forgive others as he would be forgiven.” (Mis. 129:1-5)

“Christian Science brings to light Truth and its supremacy, universal harmony, the entireness of God, good, and the nothingness of evil.” (S&H 293:28)

If evil is nothing, there is nothing to forgive.

“Christian Science teaches: Owe no man . . .”  (My. 114:3) 

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #13

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #12

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors
And Love is reflected in love.

Question: How is “Love reflected in love”?

Answer: We have learned in previous lessons that man is the reflection of God, who is Love. This line of the Lord’s Prayer is telling us that man cannot help but be loving and forgiving, since he reflects divine Love. This reflection takes form in the expression of spiritual
qualities in man and in God’s universe. For instance:

“Beauty is a thing of life, which dwells forever in the eternal Mind and reflects the charms of His goodness in expression, form, outline, and color.”  (S&H 247:21-24)

“All that God imparts moves in accord with Him, reflecting goodness and power.” (S&H 515:22)

But what are the qualities of Love that are “reflected in love”? You can try to think of a few now. Kindness, patience, and affection are examples. And, of course, forgiveness. These
qualities do not start or stop with mankind. They shine through us from God, and back to
Him again, through reflection in Mind.

“Love giveth to the least spiritual idea might, immortality, and goodness, which shine through all
as the blossom shines
through the bud. All the varied expressions of God reflect health, holiness,
immortality — infinite Life, Truth, and Love.” (S&H 518:19)

As Mary Baker Eddy states: “More love is the great need of mankind. A pure affection . . .
forgiving wrongs and forestalling
them, should swell the lyre of human love.” (Mis. 107:11-13)  

*  * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #12

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #11

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors
And Love is reflected in love.

Question: What does “reflected” mean?

Answer: Mary Baker Eddy interprets this line of the Lord’s Prayer about forgiving our debts, as: “And Love is reflected in love.” You may recall previous lessons on reflection, and how man reflects God. It is another way of saying that man is the “image and likeness of God,” as we read in the book of Genesis.

According to the dictionary, reflect means to “bend or throw back something,” such as light, heat, or sound. It can mean to give back an image of something, such as a reflection in a
mirror. It can also mean to ponder or reflect upon an idea in thought. With that in mind, see how Mrs. Eddy uses this idea of reflection:

“God is revealed only in that which reflects Life, Truth, Love, — yea, which manifests God’s attributes and power, even as the human likeness thrown upon the mirror, repeats the color, form, and
action of the person in front of the mirror.” (S&H 300:31)

“God is the creator of man, and, the divine Principle of man remaining perfect, the divine idea or
reflection, man,
remains perfect. Man is the expression of God’s being.” (S&H 470:21-24)

“Man is not God, but like a ray of light which comes from the sun, man, the outcome of God, reflects God.” (S&H 250:12)

Man is the reflection of God. Since Love is another name for God, then man also reflects Love. In the next lesson, we will see how this reflection is expressed.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #11

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #10

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors
And Love is reflected in love.

Question: How did Jesus teach and live forgiveness of debts?

Answer: A study of the four Gospels will show you many occasions in which Jesus forgave others. He forgave sins by destroying the beliefs held by the people who sought healing from him. He forgave his enemies who tried to destroy him. And, he forgave his disciples, who often fell short of wisdom or courage.

By his life, his healings, his teachings, his struggles, and, most of all, by his crucifixion, Jesus demonstrated the blessings of forgiveness. Mary Baker Eddy pointed this out in a number of ways:

“Christ Jesus paid our debt and set us free by enabling us to pay it; for which we are still his
debtors, washing the
Way-shower’s feet with tears of joy.” (My. 161:1)

“The great demonstrator of Truth and Love was silent before envy and hate. Peter would have
smitten the enemies
of his Master, but Jesus forbade him, thus rebuking resentment or animal
courage. He said: ‘Put up thy sword.’”  (S&H 48:19)

“The last act of the tragedy on Calvary rent the veil of matter, and unveiled Love’s great legacy to mortals: Love forgiving its enemies. This grand act crowned and still crowns Christianity.”
(Mis. 124:24-27)

Mrs. Eddy tells us that “Jesus was compassionate . . . ready to forgive.” (’02 18:12-13)
In gratitude to Jesus, we must also be ready to forgive.

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #10

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #9

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors
And Love is reflected in love.

Question: What if we find it difficult to forgive our debtors?

Answer: It would then be dishonest to pray this line of the Lord’s Prayer, would it not? If we cannot forgive others, it would be wrong to expect God to forgive our sins. To see that all evil, all sin, is unreal, helps to destroy those beliefs for ourselves and others. We would not be
unmerciful towards others, if we knew how innocent they really are.

But what if the sin seems so real that we just cannot see the truth as taught by Jesus and Christian Science. Simply, we have to forgive anyway, and trust that God’s purpose for all will be victorious. We must practice forgiving, and have faith in that choice, even before we can see the reason behind this required action. Here are a few more citations to ponder:

“Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry: for anger rested in the bosom of fools.” (Eccl. 7:9)

“It is error even to murmur or to be angry over sin.” (S&H 369:31-32)

“Who remembers that patience, forgiveness, abiding faith, and affection, are the symptoms by which our Father indicates the different stages of man’s recovery from sin and his entrance into Science?
(Mis. 100:28-32)

“And we solemnly promise to watch, and pray for that Mind to be in us which was also in Christ
Jesus; to do unto others
as we would have them do unto us; and to be merciful, just, and pure.”
(S&H 497:24) 

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #9

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #8

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
And Love is reflected in love;

Question: What are some steps we can take to help us forgive others?

Answer: We must first make the choice to forgive. We are to develop the attitude that Jesus taught us in the Beatitude:

“Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.” (Matt: 5:7)

Mary Baker Eddy suggests a starting point:

“One’s first lesson is to learn one’s self; having done this, one will naturally, through grace from God, forgive his brother and love his enemies.” (Mis. 129:5-8)

What if there is a strong feeling that the wrongdoer needs to be punished? Mrs. Eddy
explains we must leave this to God:

“If you have been badly wronged, forgive and forget: God will recompense this wrong, and punish, more severely than you could, him who has striven to injure you. Never return evil for evil; and,
above all, do not fancy that you have been wronged when you have not been.” (Mis. 12:5)

Note how a sense of love is important in the process of forgiving, as found in these further instructions from Mrs. Eddy:

“We must love our enemies in all the manifestations wherein and whereby we love our friends; must even try not to expose their faults, but to do them good whenever opportunity occurs.”
(Mis. 11:17-21)

“May God give unto us that loving sense of gratitude which delights in the opportunity to cancel
accounts.” (Mis. 131)

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #8

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #7

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
And Love is reflected in love;

Question: Do we have to forgive everything that others do to harm us?

Answer: There is very little, if anything, that cannot be forgiven, as Jesus proved. If someone hurts our feelings, lies to us, cheats us, steals from us, or harms us or our family, we may feel they have done something to offend us. We feel they owe us something, even if it is only an apology. Often the apologies do not come; the debts are not paid. But if we have the forgiving spirit of Jesus, we will not have to carry the mental weight of these unpaid debts, and make our hearts feel heavy. What a burden! As the Bible assures us:

“Great peace have they which love thy law: and nothing shall offend them.” (Ps. 119:165)

And Mary Baker Eddy writes:

“Nothing short of our own errors should offend us. He who can wilfully attempt to injure another, is an object of pity rather than of resentment.” (Mis. 224:28-30)

“To punish ourselves for other’s faults, is superlative folly. . . . It is our pride that makes another’s criticism rankle, our self-will that makes another’s deed offensive, our egotism that feels hurt by
another’s self-assertion. Well may we feel wounded by our own faults; but we can hardly afford to be miserable for the faults of others.” (Mis. 223:29)

“The Christian Scientist cherishes no resentment; he knows that that would harm him more than
all the malice of his
foes. Brethren, even as Jesus forgave, forgive thou. I say it with joy, — no
person can commit an offense against me that I cannot forgive.” (’02 19:8-12) 

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #7

“And forgive us our debts” – Q&A #6

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
And Love is reflected in love;

Question: What is Truth, and how does it help with forgiveness of debts or sin?

Answer: Truth is the name for God which expresses all that is real and true about Him.
The opposite of Truth is error, and error cannot be found in God. Truth includes all facts, not fables. A study of the writings of Mary Baker Eddy will show that Truth is that aspect of God
which destroys the erroneous beliefs that would try to separate us from God. For instance:

“Truth bestows no pardon upon error, but wipes it out in the most effectual manner.”
(S&H 11:17-18)

The light of Truth has increased over the centuries as mankind’s ability to receive it has grown. Truth came to us first as the Word of God; then later as the Christ, as expressed by Jesus; next, as the outreaching love of Christianity; and, today, as the Comforter, divine
Science. We see now that Truth is Law, and the presence of this Law is what destroys error.

“The law of Life and Truth is the law of Christ, destroying all sense of sin and death. It does more than forgive the false sense named sin, for it pursues and punishes it, and will not let sin go until it
is destroyed, — until nothing is left to be forgiven, to suffer, or to be punished. Forgiven thus, sickness and sin have no relapse. God’s law reaches and destroys evil by virtue of the allness of
God.” (No 30:2)

So we see that Truth does indeed help with the forgiveness of debts:

“Truth destroys error . . . Being destroyed, sin needs no other form of forgiveness.”
(S&H 339:2-5)

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Forgive #6