Monthly Archives: November 2014

The Third Commandment – Q&A #4

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: How did Jesus teach the Third Commandment?

Answer: Jesus denounced hypocrites. Hypocrites are people who pretend to be what they are not, or who pretend to be better than they are, without really being so. In the time of Jesus, a group of people known as the Pharisees was often condemned by Jesus. These Jews were critical of everyone who did not follow the Jewish laws and customs perfectly, even though they themselves often secretly broke the laws. Even worse, they broke higher laws of God by being
unmerciful and unkind to others who struggled hard to do the right thing!

“Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men’s bones, and of all uncleanness. Even so ye also outwardly appear righteous unto men, but within ye are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.”
(Matthew 23)

“PHARISEE. Corporeal and sensuous belief; self-righteousness; vanity; hypocrisy.” (S&H 592)

“Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy. For there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; neither hid, that shall not be known.” (Luke 12)

“Hypocrisy is fatal to religion.” (S&H 7)

Practice: Today, try not to criticize others for actions you may sometimes do yourself. Learn to forgive, and go easy on people when they goof up.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #4

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The Third Commandment – Q&A #3

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: What is wrong with just saying prayers? After all, we say the Lord’s Prayer out loud at church services.

Answer: It is always right to pray. Our public prayers in church often help bring a sense of unity to the service. But, in order to be honest, and not praying “in vain,” we must strive to have our private thoughts live up to our public prayers.

What if your parents are forcing you to say your prayers, even if you are not really interested? Most likely they are simply trying to help you learn the habit of turning to God in prayer. However, we all need to learn, at some point, that merely saying the words of a prayer will not help us much, unless those words are from our heart, and are meaningful.

“If we are not secretly yearning and openly striving for the accomplishment of all we ask, our prayers are ‘vain repetitions,’ such as the heathen use. If our petitions are sincere, we labor for what we ask; and our Father, who seeth in secret, will reward us openly.” (S&H 13)

“A wordy prayer may afford a quiet sense of self-justification, though it makes the sinner a hypocrite. We never need to despair of an honest heart; but there is little hope for those who come only
spasmodically face to face with their wickedness and then seek to hide it. Their
prayers are indexes which do not correspond with their character.” (S&H 8)

Further Study: You can learn a lot about prayer in the first chapter of our textbook. Today, read a few pages, and try your own “silent” prayer. Ask God for help, and listen for His angel messages.

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #3

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List of all pages and lessons in Volume One: The Ten Commandments

The Third Commandment – Q&A #2

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: What can we do to make God’s name special?

Answer: We must honor God’s name above all others, and treat it with respect.
Mary Baker Eddy tells us how:

“In divine Science all belongs to God, for God is All; hence the propriety of giving unto His holy name due deference, — the capitalization which distinguishes it from all other names, thus obeying the leading of our Lord’s Prayer . . . The coming of Christ’s kingdom on earth begins in the minds of men by honoring God and sacredly holding His name apart from the names of that which He creates. Mankind almost universally gives to the divine Spirit the name God. Christian Science names God as divine Principle, Love, the infinite Person. In this, as in all that is right, Christian Scientists are expected to stick to their text, and by no illogical conclusion, either in speaking or in writing, to forget their prayer, “Hallowed be Thy name.” (My. 225)

“If Mind was first chronologically, is first potentially, and must be first eternally, then give to Mind the glory, honor, dominion, and power everlastingly due its holy name.” (S&H 143)

“Christian Science does honor God as no other theory honors Him, and it does this in the way of His appointing, by doing many wonderful works through the divine name and nature.” (S&H 483)

Further Study: Can you remember the “seven synonyms” for God? Look for them in Science and Health on page 465. Try to memorize them in that order.  Notice how they are all capitalized.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #2

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The Third Commandment – Q&A #1

The Third Commandment

“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: What does taking God’s name “in vain” mean?

Answer: Vain describes something that is worthless, empty, hollow, unsuccessful. If we do something “in vain,” our actions would be a waste of effort. If we find ourselves speaking God’s name in a way that is disrespectful to God, such as when someone curses or swears, we are
using His name “in vain.”

If we try to use God’s name, or words about Him, to cover up evil or impure thoughts in our heart, we are taking His name “in vain.” If we promise to do something in “God’s name,” and then we break that promise, we are taking His name “in vain.” In order to be obedient to this commandment, we should habitually express God-like qualities, such as honesty and trustworthiness, before we speak or preach to others about God.

“Simply asking that we may love God will never make us love Him; but the longing to be better and holier, expressed in daily watchfulness and in striving to assimilate more of the divine character, will mould and fashion us anew, until we awake in His likeness. We reach the Science of Christianity through demonstration of the divine nature; but in this wicked world goodness will ‘be evil spoken of,’ and patience must bring experience.” (S&H 4)

Practice: “Demonstration of the divine nature” means to use in your daily life the spiritual qualities and ideas that God gives you. We don’t just sit around and think about them — we do them! Today, practice expressing the quality of joy. See if you can get others to smile!

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #1

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List of all pages and lessons in Volume One: The Ten Commandments

The Third Commandment – For Young Children

THE THIRD COMMANDMENT is . . .

“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.”

* * *
THE THIRD COMMANDMENT

“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain” MEANS . . .

that we should not use God’s name as if it had magical powers, for good or bad, just by being spoken. For instance, it is wrong to call out the name of God if you are angry at something or someone. That is called “swearing” or “cursing,” and it not only dishonors God, it is also unloving
and impolite to others. We do not use God’s name lightly or jokingly. We do not speak certain favorite words about Him over and over again, thinking that just saying the words will help us or heal us. Our goal is to have what we think, what we feel, what we say, and what we do, all flow
from the same truth.

* * *
THE THIRD COMMANDMENT

“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain” HELPS US . . .

to grow in our usefulness to God and to mankind. Why? Because we would only speak of God when we are ready to speak from our heart. Our words would come from the truth we really know and use, and would bring joy and healing to all who hear us. Our lives would be like trees that give good fruit, providing nourishment to all who welcome what we have to offer.

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.
Third Commandment - For Young Children

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Teaching Children the Third Commandment – essay
Teaching the Ten Commandments
The Third Commandment – a Christian Science Perspective

A list of all pages and lessons in Volume One: The Ten Commandments

“Hallowed be thy name” – Q&A #14

Hallowed be Thy name.
Adorable One.

Question: What does Christian Science teach us to do to hallow God’s name?

Answer: While most religions teach that man should praise and worship God, Christian Science demands that we actively demonstrate, or prove, our love for God. Mary Baker Eddy explains how:

“Christian Science does honor God as no other theory honors Him, and it does this in the way of His appointing, by doing many wonderful works through the divine name and nature.” (S&H 483:27)

“If Christian Science dishonors human belief, it honors spiritual understanding; and the one Mind only is entitled to honor.” (S&H 183:29)

“Christian Scientists must live under the constant pressure of the apostolic command to come out from the material world and be separate. They must renounce aggression, oppression and the
pride of power. Christianity, with the crown of Love upon her brow, must be their queen of life.”
(S&H 451:2)

We see from all of the above that we are to 1) do wonderful works; 2) honor spiritual understanding and the one Mind only; 3) separate our thinking from the material world; and
4) renounce all suggestions of a power apart from God.

These are some of the actions taken by those who adore the name and nature of the One Father-Mother God.

“Men must approach God reverently, doing their own work in obedience to divine law, if they would fulfil the intended harmony of being.” (Un. 13:4)

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

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Hallowed #14

“Hallowed be thy name” – Q&A #13

Hallowed be Thy name.
Adorable One.

Question: Is there a wrong way to hallow and adore God’s name?

Answer: It is not enough to say a prayer in the morning, if we do not remember to put God first in our lives the rest of the day. We should obey His commandments, and be careful how we
respond to the world beliefs that confront us.

“If we have forgotten the name of our God, or stretched out our hands to a strange god; Shall not God search this out? for he knoweth the secrets of the heart.” (Ps. 44:20, 21)

Mary Baker Eddy warns us about putting the things of matter before God:

“How much more should we seek to apprehend the spiritual ideas of God, than to dwell on the
objects of sense! To discern the rhythm of Spirit and to be holy, thought must be purely spiritual.” (S&H 510:2)

“All nature teaches God’s love to man, but man cannot love God supremely and set his whole
affections on spiritual things, while loving the material or trusting in it more than in the spiritual.” (S&H 326:8)

“This false belief as to what really constitutes life so detracts from God’s character and nature, that the true sense of His power is lost to all who cling to this falsity.” (S&H 283:21-24)

Do you see that just as we expect God to be free from mixtures of good and evil, we must see to it that we do not mix a love for God with a love of — or fear of — material things. We also want to cherish purity in ourselves and others.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

[Note: if this online posts appears to have missing lines, you may wish to switch to
another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, or sign up for email posts]

To read more about this book and blog, please see the About page. To receive these weekday posts via email, locate the “Follow” button and sign up.

Go to the Lord’s Prayer page, to read previous posts, plus introductory and background material to help in teaching the lessons.

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Hallowed #13

“Hallowed be thy name” – Q&A #12

Hallowed be Thy name.
Adorable One.

Question: What are some good ways to prove we adore God?

Answer: When we pray “Hallowed be thy name, Adorable One,” we want to really feel that
adoration. This feeling must be sincere. We want to live that adoration in our daily lives.

“Simply asking that we may love God will never make us love Him; but the longing to be better and holier, expressed in daily watchfulness and in striving to assimilate more of the divine character, will mould and fashion us anew, until we awake in His likeness.” (S&H:4:17-22)

The Bible makes some suggestions, too:

“Give thanks unto the Lord, call upon his name, make known his deeds among the people. Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him, talk ye of all his wondrous works. Glory ye in his holy name: let the heart of them rejoice that seek the Lord.” (I Chron. 16:8-10)

Mary Baker Eddy also writes: “We shall obey and adore in proportion as we apprehend the divine nature and love Him understandingly.” (S&H 140:8-10)

“It has long been a question of earnest import, How shall mankind worship the most adorable, but most unadored, — and where shall begin that praise that shall never end? Beneath, above, beyond, methinks I hear the soft, sweet sigh of angels answering, ‘So live, that your lives attest your sincerity and resound His praise.’” (Mis. 106:22)

Singing God’s praises is good. Living God’s goodness is best of all!

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume Three: The Lord’s Prayer”
Copyright 2005)

[Note: if this online posts appears to have missing lines, you may wish to switch to
another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, or sign up for email posts]

To read more about this book and blog, please see the About page. To receive these weekday posts via email, locate the “Follow” button and sign up.

Go to the Lord’s Prayer page, to read previous posts, plus introductory and background material to help in teaching the lessons.

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Hallowed #12