Monthly Archives: December 2014

The Third Commandment – Q&A #8

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: Would obeying the Third Commandment help you to heal?

Answer: Yes. In fact, practicing obedience to all the Ten Commandments helps us develop the moral muscle, or fiber, that are the foundation for spiritual growth. Obeying the Third Commandment, in particular, would help us to learn to be honest and sincere in our approach
to expressing God in our life. We don’t want to pretend we’re something, or someone, we’re not. If we did, we could not heal. Mary Baker Eddy gives a wonderful description of the kind of person who is living in obedience to both the Third Commandment and God’s law of Love:

“The upright man is guided by a fixed Principle, which destines him to do nothing but what is
honorable, and to abhor whatever is base or unworthy; hence we find him ever the same, — at all times the trusty friend, the affectionate relative, the conscientious man of business, the pious worker, the public-spirited citizen . . . He assumes no borrowed appearance. He seeks no mask to cover him, for he acts no studied part; but he is indeed what he appears to be, — full of truth, candor, and humanity. In all his pursuits, he knows no path but the fair, open, and direct one, and would much rather fail of success than attain it by reproachable means. He never shows us a smiling countenance while he meditates evil against us in his heart. We shall never find one part of his character at variance with another.”  (Mis. 147)

Practice: That description of the “upright man” is a lot to live up to. Maybe you can start today by being a trusty friend to someone who needs one.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

[Note: if this online post appears to have missing lines, you may wish to switch to
another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, or sign up for email posts]

To read more about this book and blog, please see the About page. To receive these weekday posts via email, locate the “Follow” button and sign up.

Go to the Ten Commandments page, to read previous posts, plus introductory and background material to help in teaching the lessons.

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #8

Advertisements

The Third Commandment – Q&A #7

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: Is it wrong to take an oath, or swear something, in God’s name?

Answer: If you do not take your oath seriously, it would be. If you do not plan to keep a promise of any kind, it is wrong to make it. And, if you use God’s name to make an oath or promise look stronger than it is, then it is even more wrong. We read in the Bible:

“This is the thing which the Lord hath commanded. If a man vow a vow unto the Lord, or swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond; he shall not break his word, he shall do according to all that proceedeth out of his mouth.” (Numbers 30)

Many years later, Jesus gave us an even better idea. He taught that we should keep our spoken words simple and direct, and our character worthy of trust. Then, we would not need to make oaths in God’s name. We will do whatever it is our reponsibility to do. No oaths or promises would be needed:

“Again, ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time, Thou shalt not forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths: But I say unto you, Swear not at all; neither by heaven; for
it is God’s throne . . . Neither shalt thou swear by thy head, because thou canst not make one hair white or black. But let your communication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay; for whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil.” (Matthew 5)

Practice: Promise yourself to keep your promises! Did you promise your Mom you would clean your room? Your motto: “A promise made is a promise kept.”

* * *

(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

[Note: if this online post appears to have missing lines, you may wish to switch to
another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, or sign up for email posts]

To read more about this book and blog, please see the About page. To receive these weekday posts via email, locate the “Follow” button and sign up.

Go to the Ten Commandments page, to read previous posts, plus introductory and background material to help in teaching the lessons.

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #7

The Third Commandment – Q&A #6

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: How can we improve our obedience to the Third Commandment?

Answer: We must develop a lovely quality called sincerity. Being sincere means to be truthful, straightforward, and without pretence or hypocrisy, as well as being the same in actual
character as in outward appearance. Why is this quality so important? Because it brings
success! Mary Baker Eddy makes this clear:

“Sincerity is more successful than genius or talent.” (’00 9)

“Our thoughts beget our actions; they make us what we are . . . A deep sincerity is sure of success, for God takes care of it.” (My. 203)

“Truth comes from a deep sincerity that must always characterize heroic hearts; it is the better side of man’s nature developing itself.” (‘01 1)

“Whoever would demonstrate the healing of Christian Science must abide strictly by its rules, heed
every statement, and advance from the rudiments laid down. There is nothing difficult nor toilsome in this task, when the way is pointed out; but self-denial, sincerity, Christianity, and persistence alone win the prize, as they usually do in every department of life.” (S&H 462)

One of the names of God is Truth. When we are sincere, we are expressing Truth in one of the best ways we can. If we really love Truth, God, we will love being truthful.

Practice: Think of ways you can express Truth in your daily life.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

[Note: if this online post appears to have missing lines, you may wish to switch to
another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, or sign up for email posts]

To read more about this book and blog, please see the About page. To receive these weekday posts via email, locate the “Follow” button and sign up.

Go to the Ten Commandments page, to read previous posts, plus introductory and background material to help in teaching the lessons.

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #6

 

The Third Commandment – Q&A #5

The Third Commandment
“Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain”

Question: How can we get rid of hypocrisy in our prayers, so that they will be worthwhile and not in vain?

Answer: We can start by following the words and example of Christ Jesus, the Master Christian and our Wayshower:

“And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men . . . But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly. But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking.” (Matthew 6)

And Mary Baker Eddy writes:

“If we are ungrateful for Life, Truth, and Love, and yet return thanks to God for all blessings, we are insincere and incur the sharp censure our Master pronounces on hypocrites. In such a case, the
only acceptable prayer is to put the finger on the lips and remember our blessings. While the heart is far from divine Truth and Love, we cannot conceal the ingratitude of barren lives.” (S&H 3-4)

“If we feel the aspiration, humility, gratitude, and love which our words express, — this God accepts; and it is wise not to try to deceive ourselves or others, for ‘there is nothing covered that shall not
be revealed.’” (S&H 8)

Practice: Today, spend time thanking God for all your blessings. Perhaps make a written list and title it: “Gratitude is a Healing Attitude.” Use as a reminder.

* * *
(Excerpted from “First Lessons in Christian Science, Volume One: The Ten Commandments”
Copyright 2001)

[Note: if this online post appears to have missing lines, you may wish to switch to
another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome, or sign up for email posts]

To read more about this book and blog, please see the About page. To receive these weekday posts via email, locate the “Follow” button and sign up.

Go to the Ten Commandments page, to read previous posts, plus introductory and background material to help in teaching the lessons.

To print out the image below, which is from the original book, click on the image and save to your computer. To read explanation on how to use these “clip and carry” lessons, see the About page.

Third - Q&A #5